@impactEduk

@impacteduk is a community for educators to discuss and debate the innovations and practices in education and evaluate them against research for impact on children’s learning. It is a community interested in evidence and rigour. This is not the place for anecdotes and opinions, unless they are to stimulate discussion. This is a community where people are respected, and ideas are evaluated critically.

Homework

So, what do we actually know?

  1. Peer Reviewed Evidence: John Hattie’s study shows that ‘the effects of the current methodology of homework are small’ – average effect size of ’0.29′ (Visible Learning for Teachers; Routledge 2011) .
  2. Anecdotal Evidence: The main driver for setting it, aside from the reference to setting homework in the new Ofsted framework, are parents. At our school, some parents complain that not enough is being set, so to keep them happy we need to keep setting it.  (via datafiend.wordpress.com)
  3. Published Book: “Does Homework Improve Learning? …. At best, most homework studies show only an association, not a causal relationship” Chapter 2 THE HOMEWORK MYTH(Da Capo Press, 2006)  Alfie Khon http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/hwach.htm  (via@theokk)
  4. Peer Reviewed Evidence:Homework: a review of recent research: Caroline Sharp, Wendy Keys and Pauline Benefield (2001) available here massive literature review, summary of it:  Hwk might help at secondary, but there is no evidence of any impact at primary.
  5. Peer Reviewed Evidence:Results from the OECD Pisa study, which compares school systems around the world, finds a strong association between children’s reading performance at 15, and home activities such as discussing politics, talking about books or films and eating meals together as a family.  (from @guardian)
  6. Peer Reviewed Evidence: OECD PISA study into efficacy of homework (2003)  it seems to descirbe a different picture for different sbjects, and suggests a strong link between homework and improvement in Mathematics.  The report can be found, in full, here:
  7. Blog: There is a well considered blog and debate here @headteacherguru.  This blog highlights differences between impact in Primary and Secondary contexts and includes commentary from Hattie himself.
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6 comments on “Homework

  1. We know there is no ‘good reason’ to keep giving homework.
    What we don’t know is why schools persist doing so.

    • peteyeo
      July 16, 2012

      All true – how do we know? What’s our evidence base?

  2. l4l1
    July 16, 2012

    How do we know it is true? You will have to cite studies to show this or show lack of it. For example there are no academic studies I know of that prove school uniform improves academic performance however there may be studies to show it has other social or other benefits. I think we all have to do a little digging here to either challenge our assumptions or to pose questions which “may” lead us closer to some form of consensus – or otherwise 😉

  3. theo kuechel (@theokk)
    July 16, 2012

    “Does Homework Improve Learning? …. At best, most homework studies show only an association, not a causal relationship”

    Chapter 2 THE HOMEWORK MYTH
    (Da Capo Press, 2006

    Alfie Khon http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/hwach.htm

  4. datafiend
    October 6, 2012

    John Hattie’s study shows that ‘the effects of homework are small’ – average effect size of ‘0.29’ (Visible Learning for Teachers; Routledge 2011) . The main driver for setting it, aside from the reference to setting homework in the new Ofsted framework, are parents. At our school, some parents complain that not enough is being set, so to keep them happy we need to keep setting it.

  5. peteyeo
    April 26, 2013

    Reblogged this on The Grinch Manifesto and commented:

    One I wrote for @impacteduk http://www.impacteduk.wordpress.com

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This entry was posted on July 15, 2012 by .
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